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More Good Reads about Hearing Loss

The Hearing Loss Association of California publishes a quarterly newsletter, “The Hearing Loss Californian.”  If you are a member of the Hearing Loss Association of America and join a chapter in California, you will automatically receive this newsletter.  It is also available online:  http://www.hearinglossca.org/newsletter .  The Fall 2013 issue has an excellent list of books about hearing loss compiled by Bruce Harris from the HLA-East Bay Chapter.

I never knew there were so many books about hearing loss for children!  Follow the link to Children’s Books in the last item of this list.  Kay Powell has compiled a wonderful annotated bibliography with links to Amazon to purchase the books.

There is more than one page of books – be sure to notice the menu bar at the top:
Fiction     Non-Fiction     Sign Language      Videos     Misc.

These books are not just for children with hearing loss or children with a family member with hearing loss, but are excellent for increasing awareness of hearing loss and eliminating the stigma of wearing hearing aids – for any child or any classroom.  If I were still teaching, I would definitely be adding to my library!  In fact, I can hardly resist buying some now!

BOOKS about Hearing Loss

Children with Hearing Loss–A Family Guide by David Luterman, D.Ed, Editor

 Dr. Mark Ross on Hearing Loss, Professor Emeritus of Audiology, University of Connecticut.
See http://www.hearingresearch.org/ross/

Facing the Challenge: A Survivor’s Manual for Hard ofHearing People by HLAA-Oregon.
See http://www.hearinglossor.org

Listen with the Heart: Relationships & Hearing Loss by Dr. Michael A. Harvey, Clinical Psychologist.

Ototoxic Drugs Exposed—The Shocking Truth About Prescription Drugs and Other Chemicals That Can (and Do) Damage Our Ears by Neil Bauman, Ph.D.

Shouting Won’t Help. Why I—and 50 Million Other Americans—Can’t Hear You by Katherine Bouton

The Better Hearing Institute (BHI)
See http://www.betterhearing.org/publications/eGuides/index.cfm/

 The Consumer Handbook on Tinnitus by Richard S. Tyler, PhD, Editor

The Feel of Silence by Bonnie Poitras Tucker

The Living With Hearing Loss Program by Sam Trychin, Ph.D.
See http://www.trychin.com

 The Praeger Guide to Hearing and Hearing Loss: Assessment, Treatment, and Prevention by Susan Dalebout

 Your Child’s Hearing Loss: What Parents Need to Know by Debby Waldman.

 Children’s Books, compiled by Kay Powell
See http://www.listen-up.org/h_books/kids.htm

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What Did You Say? by Monique Hammond

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I just finished reading Monique Hammond’s new book, “What Did You Say?  An Unexpected Journey Into The World of Hearing Loss.”   I thought it was excellent!  Hammond experienced a sudden, severe hearing loss in the fall of 2005 and wrote the book “….she wishes she had when she was coping with and trying to understand her own hearing loss.”

“What Did You Say?” combines her personal story with a comprehensive overview of many aspects of hearing loss.  The book is well-written, well-researched, and easy to understand.  I highly recommend it for anyone with concerns about hearing, whether you are newly diagnosed with hearing loss, you have a moderate progressive loss, a sudden severe loss, or you have been living with hearing loss for many years.

The book is divided into seven sections and they do not need to be read in order.  If you are soon to purchase your first hearing aid, you could start with “Part Four – Hearing Instrument Basics:  Styles, Technology, Sales.”  If you are looking for an assisted listening device, go to “Part Five – Assisted Listening Devices; ASL; Speech Reading.”  In the appendix are nine handy checklists such as “Selecting a Hearing Aid Vendor” and “Preparing for a Doctor Appointment Regarding Tinnitus.”M. Hammond smaller Monique Hammond is a pharmacist and her medical background enhances her writing, especially the section on the anatomy and function of the ear and her description of ototoxic substances.  You can also read Hammond’s article,“Making Sense of Ototoxicity” in the “Hearing Loss Magazine” March/April 2013 issue.

Tour Guide Kits

Want to know how beer is made?  Take a tour of a brewery – and be bombarded by noise!

Take the underground tour of Seattle?  Very interesting – if you run and stand next to the tour guide at each stop so you can hear some of her jokes!

Museum tour?  Better bring your own listening device!

I am really amazed at how many places give tours with no assisted listening devices!  These are not just for the hard-of-hearing!  They make the tour accessible and more enjoyable for everyone!

See Hear Gear’s solution from a small 7-person to a 30-person tour guide kit made by Listen Technologies:  Tour Guide and Interpretation Systems

They can be used in noisy trade shows, outdoor presentations, on a bus, a cruise, campus tours, museums, lectures, manufacturing plants and many more places.  The devices are easy to use and the sound clarity is phenomenal.  Also excellent for translation services.  Tell your favorite inaccessible museum about these excellent and affordable solutions!